PlatformQ Health

 

Two Neurology Patient Poster Sessions to be Presented at AAN 2018 Annual Meeting

PlatformQ Health is pleased to announce our education team will present two poster sessions at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology April 23 and 24 in Los Angeles, California.

Anne Roc of PlatformQ Health

“We’re proud to be selected to share insights from two of our educational initiatives, one in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and another in Pseudobulbar Affect Disorder (PBA),” shared Anne Roc, lead author and Senior Medical Director at PlatformQ Health. “These two sessions will display insights from our outcomes-driven online education – the first through a series of interactive clinician programs in MS, the second, an aligned educational series with dedicated sessions for clinicians and patients in PBA.”

We hope you’ll join us for our in-person poster sessions at AAN 2018:

 

Effects of Live-Online Education on Multiple Sclerosis Disease Management: Changes in Patient Experience, Clinical Practice, Provider Knowledge and Competence
April 23, 2018 – 5:30-7:00pm
Abstract # 3145, Publication # P2.422

 

Effects of Education on Symptom Recognition and Management of Pseudobulbar Affect: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation of Knowledge and Behavior Changes of Clinicians and Patients
April 24, 2018 – 5:30-7:00pm
Abstract # 3540, Publication # P3.087

 

Full details about each session can be found below.

Unable to attend, and want to learn more about our network of learning channels and why we’re the fastest growing medical and health education network in the U.S.? Contact Lauren Alford at lalford@platformq.com.

 

 

Effects of Live-Online Education on Multiple Sclerosis Disease Management: Changes in Patient Experience, Clinical Practice, Provider Knowledge and Competence
Authors: Anne Roc (PlatformQ Health), Wendy Turell (PlatformQ Health), Patricia Coyle (SUNY At Stony Brook), Fred Lublin (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)
Objective: We evaluated learner responses from 4 continuing medical education (CME) activities focused on MS disease management in order to assess the influence of education on addressing practice gaps.
Background: The highly variable and heterogeneous nature of MS warrants individualized care. The treatment landscape with disease modifying therapies (DMTs) has been rapidly evolving and clinical guidelines are unable to keep pace, causing a number of practice gaps among clinicians who care for MS patients.
Design/Methods: Four 1-hour video CME activities with slides, polling/live questions launched live-online October 16, 2015 through July 30, 2017 at www.NeuroSeriesLive.com. For each activity, CME test questions were administered at 3 time points (pre-, immediate post-, 8-weeks post). Responses from CME test, polling/live, and 8 week post activity survey were analyzed to determine engagement, lessons learned, and continuing gaps. McNemar test compared matched pair responses (who completed both pre/post & pre/8wk, respectively). Effect size was computed using Cohen’s d.
Results: A total of 186 of 2,361 learners completed questions from all 3 time points. On average, 69% of learners reported a positive impact on patient experience after CME, and 77% reported a positive impact on clinical practice. Per activity, a strong majority of learners reported commitments to change in regards to: medical/practice knowledge (90%), care attitudes (86%), practice behavior (82%), and patient clinical outcomes (78%). Data from 9 competence and 10 knowledge questions reflected improvements in applying knowledge of DMTs and multiple patient factors (eg, disease activity, risk tolerance, lifestyle preference) to treatment decision making (from selection and initiation, to modification, and discontinuation).
Conclusions: Ongoing MS education can yield immediate and sustained gains in knowledge, competence, and performance, which may translate to providing individualized care and improved outcomes for patients.
Study Supported by: Unrestricted educational grants from Abbvie, Genentech, Sanofi/Genzyme, and Teva Pharmaceuticals

 

 

Effects of Education on Symptom Recognition and Management of Pseudobulbar Affect: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation of Knowledge and Behavior Changes of Clinicians and Patients
Anne Roc (PlatformQ Health), Wendy Turell (PlatformQ Health), Erik Pioro (Cleveland Clinic)
Objective: Using a mixed-methods approach, we evaluated self-reported changes in confidence, knowledge and behaviors among clinicians and patients following education on pseudobulbar affect (PBA).
Background: PBA is a secondary condition to serious neurologic disease or injury. PBA symptoms are often incorrectly attributed to mood disorders, and causes stigma and social isolation. Documented knowledge gaps from clinicians and patients contribute to delayed/missed diagnosis and undertreatment of PBA.
Design/Methods: Two 1-hour live-online video activities were launched 2016-2017 for clinicians and patients. Test questions were administered at pre-, immediate post-, and 8-weeks post activity. Responses from test, polling/live, and 8wk survey were analyzed to determine engagement, lessons learned, and continuing gaps.
Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 clinicians and 13 patients. Quantitative data was analyzed with McNemar test (pre/post & pre/8wk matched pairs) and Cohen’s d effect size, and qualitative data with a grounded theory approach.
Results: 60 of 1,128 clinicians completed all activity questions, 58% of whom reported the activity had a positive impact on patient experience and outcome, and 75% had an impact on their clinical practice. Most reported commitments to change in: medical/practice knowledge (91%), care attitudes (89%), practice behavior (83%), and patient clinical outcomes (80%). Clinician interviewees identified symptom recognition and differentiation as the most challenging aspect of PBA evaluation and management. In the patient group, 52 of 213 completed all activity questions, 76% of whom reported improved communication with their doctors about PBA, and 34% reported improvements in health-related behaviors. For patients, the activity normalized the stigma by emphasizing PBA’s neurological basis; reassured and provided hope in relation to symptom management and reduction over time; and reinforced the potential for effective treatment.
Conclusions: Education on symptom recognition and management of PBA directed to clinicians and patients separately can have a positive sustained impact on knowledge and behaviors.
Study Supported by: Unrestricted educational grants from Avanir Pharmaceuticals

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